What type of fall protection do you believe should be required for roofers on residential buildings?

Employers should generally provide fall protection if workers are exposed to a fall of 6 feet or more at a lower level. One form of fall protection is a personal fall protection system (PFAS).

What type of fall protection do you believe should be required for roofers on residential buildings?

Employers should generally provide fall protection if workers are exposed to a fall of 6 feet or more at a lower level. One form of fall protection is a personal fall protection system (PFAS). When used correctly, these systems stop a fall and prevent the worker from coming into contact with a lower level. Roofing fall protection kits come standard with a multidynamic full-body harness.

They're lightweight, especially if you don't want to support the extra weight of the padding. If you work in a warm climate and are concerned about the effects that heat can have on your health and safety, you may prefer a harness with less padding. Working with heating and air conditioning systems near roof edges would be another example where a mobile fall protection system would be a good option for workers. Fall protection is important for roofers, who not only work at height, but often do so while working at steep angles where a slip could prove catastrophic.

Kit systems are designed more for fall containment than fall protection, so if that system is configured the right way, it won't allow you to get off the roof. A mobile fall protection system is ideal for a two-story building with gutters, facades or windows, since you work above the edge of the roof. If you fall off a roof and have the opportunity to use a body harness, but you didn't do it because you thought it was inconvenient, that decision in a split second could have lasting results. If you know that the roof edge is 10 feet from the anchor point, you should adjust the rope grip to 6 or 7 feet so you can't physically fall over the edge.

When you and several workers work on a small roof and it has a peak or slope, you'll want to use a roofing kit instead of a mobile fall protection system. Working at heights adds unique challenges and increases hazard levels for construction equipment and roofers, and safety systems need to be in place to help protect them in the event of a fall. If you fall, it will lock up and you will fall on the surface of the roof, not on one side. If you don't want to make adjustments to your roof surface, mobile fall protection could be your solution.

If your roofers are working on the edge and falling off the roof, you don't have to worry about the lifeguard coming into contact with an edge. For customers who do not want to penetrate their roofs because they are concerned that they will seal and leak, especially if it is a closed roof, there are fall protection systems with a non-penetrating counterweight. If you are working on a roof, you would place it above the gutters and not blow it up at the top of the center of the roof because the risk of falling is outside the roof.